SCS3 – Ship Construction & Stability 3

Ship Construction & Stability 3

Ship Construction and Stability covers basic ship stability and vessel construction. For this level you do not need to be an expert in Stability, but you need to prove a good knowledge of the principles and to be able to complete basic calculations. You must also be able to understand and interpret data from stability booklets, including the statical stability curves.

For the construction side you will need to be able to identify and describe basic terminology and how it relates to the ship. Identification of specific components (beams, frames, knees etc.) from a ship’s plan is also required.

You will also need to be able to demonstrate knowledge of the Canadian Loadline Regulations.

Syllabus

Ship Construction and Stability, Level 3 (Page 133, Section 8.7)

Recommended Reading:

Stability:

Ship Stability for Masters and Mates This book is highly recommended my the majority of those asked. It has a good amount of diagrams that help explain the ideas. This book also includes practice questions in the back so you can work on your calculations.

or

Ship Stability This is a Dokmar book, and as such uses a lot of full colour diagrams and photographs. It is recommended for those who like visual aids to their learning. Dokkum has also included information about sailing vessels and other types of ship that are not typically represented in stability textbooks.

or

Merchant Ship Stability This is is the classic, written by Pursey. It has been updated many times over the years, most recently in 2006. Of the three titles we recommend it has the least drawings, but does use many examples to help explain concepts. This book includes practice questions..

 

Construction:

Ship Knowledge Another Dokmar book. Excellent, with lots of full colour diagrams and photos. It also has some very useful (and cool looking!) graphical representations of stress on a hull and the resultant construction requirements. The one weakness of the book is that it is superficial with man topics due to the wide range that it covers, but it is more than adequate for the required SCS 3 knowledge.

or

Ship Construction Published by Butterworth and Heineman (same as Ship Stability for Masters and Mates). This is a good, solid book on ship construction; it has a decent amount of diagrams, and they are useful. Included are the modern CAD and lofting processes that shipyards utilize.

or

Merchant Ship Construction Written by Pursey as a companion to his Merchant Ship Stability. This book was updated in 2002, but is out-of-date in regards to modern shipyards practices and computer processes. Nonetheless, it is  an excellent book for those just starting to learn about ship construction and it covers all of the basics and major principles.

Downloads:

Canadian Loadline Regulations

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